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20120928
20121006
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of state hillary clinton meets with the israeli prime minister later this evening. for more on all of this we get two views. paul pillar had a 28-year career at the c.i.a., much of it focusing on the middle east. he's now a non resident fellow at georgetown university. and robert satloff is executive director of the washington institute for near east policy, a washington think tank. and we thank you both for being with us again. let me start with you, paul pillar. did you hear something new in what prime minister netanyahu said today? >> not really. the prime minister, of course, has been agitating and warning on the subject for quite some time and going beyond mr. netanyahu we've seen over the last several years, in fact, progressive projections that iran is on the verge of a nuclear weapon. most of those projections have not borne out. but what we didn't get in this-- in the comments by the prime minister was really a clear sense of what his preferred red line would be. if we take literally what he did with his red marker on his prop it would suggest he's say nothing 90% enrichme
to discuss ways to bolster support for syria's opposition. secretary of state hillary clinton hosted the "friends of syria" group along the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly meeting. two of syria's key allies, russia and china, were not included in the talks. clinton said the u.s. was offering the opposition an additional $45 million in non- lethal and humanitarian aid. she also used the opportunity to single out iran for aiding forces loyal to president bashar al-assad. 's most important lifeline is iran. last week a senior iranian official publicly acknowledged that members of the iranian revolutionary guard corp. are operating inside syria. there is no longer any doubt that tehran will do whatever it takes to protect its proxy and crony in damascus. >> sreenivasan: in washington, defense secretary leon panetta confirmed the u.s. has intelligence that shows the syrian regime has moved some of its chemical weapons to better secure them. he also said the major stockpiles at main sites are believed to be secure. in august, president obama threatened u.s. action if syria moves or
imposed against iran's nuclear program. secretary of state hillary clinton pledged anew today to get to the bottom of a deadly attack in libya last month. u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed after gunmen assaulted the u.s. consulate in benghazi. now, two leading house republicans have charged the obama administration rejected requests for enhanced security at the site. clinton cautioned today against a rush to judgment. >> at the beginning of any kind of inquiry or investigation there are going to be different perspectives, different points of view, people trying to present what they believe applies to a certain set of circumstances. but i've also seen how important it is to get everything lined up and analyzed. >> holman: clinton also promised the investigative process will be transparent. more than two million factory workers walked off the job in indonesia today, in a one-day strike demanding better benefits. hundreds of thousands marched through the streets of a jakarta suburb. they called for an increase in the minimum wage plus health insur
the middle class is the result of policies that romney and ryan are supporting. in clinton, iowa, vice presidential nominee paul ryan said a romney administration would help more americans find jobs. >> we have a jobs crisis in america. wouldn't it be nice to have a job creator in the white house? ( applause ) we can't afford four more years. we need a real recovery. take a look at just jobs. we lost 582,000 manufacturing jobs since the president took office. he's offering a new tax increase on our job creators that will cost us 700,000 jobs. we're offering really forms. >> ifill: which candidate has the better plan to get the economy back on track? that's the key question in battleground states like north carolina, which only months ago seemed out of reach for the democrats this year. but it's back in play again. jeffrey brown traveled there to discover why. >> lead the way. brown: 26-year-old dewayne owens who served in the marines and is now a professional mixeded marshal artist usually takes on tougher opponents than your correspondent. >> i see. brown: but this weekend on a break
official in the clinton administration. he now teaches at lehigh university. and hisham melhem, washington bureau chief of al-arabiya news. gentlemen, good to have you both with us. so let me start with you, henri barkey, we heard in that report an accident, a stray shell. how did events come to this? >> well, there's a lot of fighting on the border. there's been shelling before. this is not the first time that shells fell on the turkish side. in fact, last week the turks sent a protest to the syrians because there was a whole series of shells that fell on to farm so if this had happened differently yesterday, in other words, if the shells had fallen on farmland and not killed five people we wouldn't be discussing this tonight and there would not be a security council resolution. so it's a little bit happenstance to some extent. >> warner: but the tension between the two countries has been building? >> the tension has been building. the turks are supporting the free syrian army. they're allowing the free syrian army a base to operate against syria. the turkish government has taken a very s
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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